Posted by & filed under AWS/Linux/Unix/Devops stuff.

New to Virtualbox 3.2 OSE is a built in VNC server for accessing your Virtualbox VMs. This is a great feature, and I like this more than the VRDP feature available in the commercial Virtualbox since there is a wider variety of VNC clients that I’m aware of for Mac OS X in comparison to RDP clients.

However, I don’t believe this feature is compiled in by default just yet, and finding recent versions of Virtualbox OSE seems to be a ¬†little tricky on some distros anyway, so I set out to compile this for myself with VNC server support on Ubuntu 10.04. The following is what I did to get it to compile and run properly…

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Posted by & filed under AWS/Linux/Unix/Devops stuff.

As of Virtualbox 3.2 the default disk controller has been changed from IDE to SATA. If you had setup a Virtualbox disk in a previous version, unless you opted for using the SATA (or SCSI, SAS) controller, chances are you are using IDE. You can confirm this by putting your mouse over the disk icon in the lower status bar of a VM window, which should reveal the controller type being used for the current disk.

If you are using the IDE controller, with a small amount of work you can switch to the faster SATA controller without having to reinstall the entire OS and recreate your images. You can also switch to the SATA controller if you are using the SCSI, and presumably the SAS controller as well. Here is how…

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Posted by & filed under Web Development.

As great and as useful branches are in Git, every once in a while we may forget to create a new branch when we meander off with experimental changes, or changes that may take longer to complete than changes you may want to commit in the meantime. No worries, it is still quite easy to commit only the files that you want with committing everything else. Here’s how…

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Posted by & filed under Web Development.

A “remote branch” is a branch that you are not in charge of maintaining, and is not a part of your local repository. It would be rather chaotic if we just let people have free access to write what they want to our branches. This would make accounting for changes at least somewhat difficult! Therefore, Git provides a way to add remote branches to your repository to “track” changes and merge them in with your own.

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Posted by & filed under WordPress.

As of WordPress 2.9 a very useful feature has been added that allows users to designate a thumbnail for each post, as well as its dimensions. This feature requires a slight modification to your theme to enable it, as well as some familiarity with some new related template tags.

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Posted by & filed under Web Development.

These errors when going a “git pull” can be very confusing. They indicate that there are local changes that would otherwise be obliterated, and you are prevented from continuing unless you commit your changes, move or delete the file before doing a pull, or the following workaround…

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Posted by & filed under Javascript/YUI/jQuery.

Using Prototype we can capture the return key (and other key presses) to replace the usual form submission with our own Javascript functions. This is useful if we, say, want to do some Javascript-based error checking on the form prior to submission when the user presses their return key, or invoke a search via a return key press within a search field.

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Posted by & filed under AWS/Linux/Unix/Devops stuff.

If you are interested in reproducing a backup scheme similar to Apple’s Time Machine on non OS X Linux/Unix machine, it is actually pretty easy to do so using a combination of rsync and cpio. You obviously won’t get the pretty space themed GUI (or any sort of GUI), but you will get as many complete snapshots as you like where hard links are used to account for files that haven’t changed in order to save a very significant amount of disk space. This is the same scheme used by Time Machine, although with this approach you can also have your source and destination machines be totally separate machines, even located in different physical locations so long as both are accessible via SSH.

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Posted by & filed under WordPress.

The following set of instructions will encapsulate your WordPress data into a dump file you can transfer to a different host (if applicable), and then update all WordPress database references to point to your new domain (including all of the images you have attached to your posts and pages).

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